Here, There be a Writer

Thursday, July 5, 2018

Post challenge

Well, I made it, Dear Readers (okay...maybe a little late)!



Okay, I am VERY late with this post; between finishing A to Z and my Kickstarter getting funded, and then getting cast in a production of Curtains: the Musical, there has been little free time lately. I am working on changing that though. In the meantime here are some thoughts on this years Blogging A to Z.

First, I actually planned out my posts and having a theme and something planned for each day really helped. That helped, especially on days that I had little spare time. Books were my theme, I picked a book that corresponded with the days letter. There are plenty of books I have read, so I was able to blog about each book. Although something to consider is that as I read books I should take some noted, just in case I plan to use that book for a future A to Z challenge, or any future blog. It is a bit more work, but I think it might help me to focus on details of the book.

Second, when I decided to do NaPoWriMo-National Poetry Writing Month, which means writing a poem a day-as well, it gave my posts a bit more substance. I'm a poet by nature, so it only makes sense that I would write a poem about that days featured book. Even if I wasn't doing NaPoWriMo I think I would still write a poem about whatever topic I was writing about (book, movie, etc.), because that is what I do.

Third, I need to push myself a bit harder when I do these challenges, because I find that when I have something to strive for then I manage to achieve those goals. This means next year I will plan out my April, and outline each post. It feels like a lot of work, but I think I can make my posts more engaging and provocative.

Blogging from A to Z has always been a challenge that I love to return to, and I hope you have enjoyed this years posts. Happy Reading!

jeltovski at morguefile

Monday, April 30, 2018

Z is for Zebra (On Beyond)

What lies beyond Zebra? Past the letter Z? There appears to be a whole new branch of critters that exist solely beyond the letter Z and zebra.

On Beyond Zebra written by Dr. Seuss always fascinated me with the strange creatures and the strange letters that looked sort of like runes, or the ogham alphabet. That was before I knew what the ogham alphabet was. I think I imagined trying to write sentences with these new letters, I don't  was successful in this venture.

There were a few books of Dr. Seuss that feature new creatures, from On Beyond Zebra, If I Ran the Zoo, and If I Ran the Circus are the main ones that featured undiscovered creatures. But the thin about many Dr. Seuss books is that there was usual an animal, or place with a strange and ever-long/how-do-you-pronounce that name in the stories. I definitely remember the names, and certainly imagining what those places looked like, beyond the actually stories.

What are your favourite Seussian creatures from any of the books? Leave me a comment below, Dear Readers.


Beyond the Known

When striking the last line
at the bottom of the letter Zed.
You should know there is a lot more than
what you already know.

At the bottom of the letter Zed,
there is a letter called a Yuzz.
What you already know
about life after Zebra?

There is a letter called a Yuzz,
the beginning of the 'after Z safari,'
about life after Zebra,
and all of the things that exist.

The beginning of the 'after Z safari'
will surprise you with it's diversity
and all of the things that exist,
beyond what you know.

Will surprise you with it's diversity
and maybe some rhyming,
beyond what you know;
maybe even want to know them all.

And maybe some rhyming
as you begin to explore the terrain,
maybe want to know they all,
like some sort of game.

As to begin to explore the terrain,
you should know there is a lot more;
like some sort of game
when striking the last line.

Sunday, April 29, 2018

NaPoWriMo: Hidden Identities


Shakespeare Sunday and a pantoum for 12th Night. Enjoy! 

Also, I am a little glad that April and NaPoWriMo/Blogging A to Z is almost over I am a little whupped in the poetic department. It's been fun, and planning ahead as certainly helped, but I am ready to be done. Still, today was a challenge as I haven't actually read 12th Night all the way through. I hope I did it justice anyway, Dear Readers.


Hidden Identities

A hidden gender truth
from one who wants to find her way.
Mistaken identities run loose 
from the company in Illyria.

From one who wants to find her way,
is loved by a lady, who is also loved by the Duke
from the company in Illyria,
where a sibling lost has returned;

And is loved by a lady, who is also loved by the Duke,
but also finds the stranger in town familiar,
where a sibling lost has returned
and holds the fancy of the Duke's love.

But also finds the stranger in town familiar,
in his care for the lost Sebastian who,
and holds the fancy of the Duke's love,
a pentagon of love.

In his care for the lost Sebastian who;
a story of he loves she, loves her or him,
a pentagon of love.
Here's a clue, all works out in the end.

A story of he loves she, loves her or him,
mistaken identities run loose
Here's a clue, all works out in the end,
a hidden gender truth.

Saturday, April 28, 2018

Y is for Year of the Flood (The)

The sequel to Margaret Atwood's dystopian series, The Maddaddam Series: The Year of the Flood takes the story of two new characters and their fighting chance to survive the world after the waterless flood.

Set in the same world as Oryx and Crake, you now get to see life in the city and beyond, how people ho have survived are surviving. There is Ren, a trapeze artist trapped in a sex club and Toby, former member of the cult God's Gardeners and is trapped in an abandoned spa. This is their story about breaking free and what waits for them on the outside. Imagine the world of Snowman and Crake's Children it is wild and dangerous, and thoroughly enjoyable.

Margaret Atwood's created a wild world that so invests your time and attention in the details, but not sacrificing the story.

Have you, Dear Readers, ever read Margaret Atwood? What books, or short stories? Wat do you want to read? The MaddAddam Trilogy is still my favourite.


Waterless

When there is nothing left,
after the flood has passed;
is not one of water that takes the lives
and leave the world's survivor left.

After the flood has passed,
what will you do;
and leave the world's survivors left
to inherit what's left of the earth.

What will you do?
Are you meek enough
to inherit whats left of the earth
after everyone is gone.

Are you meek enough,
to take on the wrath of Animalia
after everyone is gone,
and all that is left to eat are cocktail wienies?

To take on the wrath of Animalia
in the days after the flood
and all that are left to eat are cocktail wienies or
to eat something called Jolt Bars.

In the days after the flood,
locked way, safe and sound
to eat something called Jolt Bars
and avoid starving to death.

Locked away, safe and sound--
is not one of water that takes the lives
and avoid starving to death,
when there is nothing left.

Friday, April 27, 2018

X is for Xanadu

You want a trip in the surreal? Maybe with rock music? Someplace where ELO meets Big Bands...and Gene Kelly. Oh, and there's roller skating too!

Sound like a fever dream? Maybe...

It's Xanadu!

First a poem titled Kubla Khan in 1797 by a poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge (belo w is the first stanza), it's about the Mongolian ruler Kubla Khan, the grandson of Genghis Khan dreaming in his pleasure palace;  a movie in 1980; and later musical in 2007.

In Xanadu did Kubla Khan 
A stately pleasure-dome decree: 
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran 
Through caverns measureless to man 
Down to a sunless sea. 

Xanadu is defined as an idyllic place, a place place of great beauty, luxury, contentment. From dictionary.com and Merriam-Webster online dictionary.

Xanadu is many thing all rolled into one. The primary story centers on the Greek muses, nine sisters and one muse in particular, Kira's (real name is Terpsichore. Clio in the musical.) and her adventures on earth. The funny part is the movie is adaptation of a movie from Down to Earth (1947), which is an adaptation of a play Heaven Can Wait. The movie is filled with rock music from ELO (Electric Light Orchestra), Olivia Newton-John, who plays Kira in the movie, and early animation from Don Bluth. Never mind that it is about a roller disco and features Gene Kelly in his last movie role; and one amazing scene that blends 1940s and 1980s music into the most intense mash-up ever.

It was also one of two movie nominated for the first ever Golden Raspberry Award, but lost out to the Village People movie, Can't Stop the Music.

It also needs to be seen to be believed.


A Musing Inspiration

Where is the inspiration?
The Greeks believed the Muses inspired,
giving mankind a leg up in creativity
in song, poetry, and dance.

The Greeks believed the Muses inspired,
nine sisters to grant humanity gifts
in song, poetry, and dance;
to create something out of nothing.

Nine sisters to grant humanity gifts,
although I prefer my gifts to be my own,
to create something out of nothing,
but maybe I am wrong.

Although I prefer my gifts to be my ow,n,
weaving words across a page or colours across a canvas,
but maybe I am wrong,
that gifts are given to us, for us make our own.

Weaving words across a page or colours across a canvas; 
that is our job, isn't it?
That gifts are given to us, for us make our own,
out of the spiritual ether around us.

That is out jobs, isn't it,
make the art that the world needs
out of the spiritual ether around us?
That might just be the gods bequeathing their gifts.

Make the art that the world needs,
giving mankind a leg up in creativity
that might just be the gods bequeathing their gifts.
What is the inspiration? 

Thursday, April 26, 2018

W is for Witch (of Blackbird Pond)

This was a school book that I read in middle school. This is a book that I love so much I went out and found me a copy and reread it years later. This is a book that is worth the read, young or old.

The Witch of Blackbird Pond was written by Elizabeth George Speare and published n 1958.

The story is of one Kit Tyler, who after her Grandfather's death travels from Barbados, where she was raised to Wethersfield, Connecticut. After she becomes an orphan she finds  her Aunt Rachel and Uncle Matthew in the north and happen to be puritans. Kit is not! She's lives on atropical island with servants her whole life. Now she has to learn how to fit, smack in the middle of a colder and darker world, one that thinks anything different is wrong and she has to work to earn her way. She meets and befriends Hannah Tupper, a Quaker, and fellow outcast. The village believes is a witch. Kit tries very hard to fit in  and wants to help, but finds herself suspected of witchcraft. It is only because someone comes forward explaining that Kit was just trying to help, and Kit is released from her suspicion. Her name is cleared.

The Witch of Blackbird Pond is a wonderful story set in a familiar time period, but is told is such a way that you can picture what Wethersfield looks like, or Hannah Tupper's house, or the deck of the ship The Dolphin. I love livid imagery and wonderful detailed places, and yet it doesn't sacrifice the story. If you get a chance, you should definitely read. it.

Island Girl

Traveling across the ocean
to a cold and faraway place,
where you know no one,
and everyone believes you are wrong.

To a cold and faraway place,
where suspicion reigns eternal
and everyone believes you are wrong,
because you can swim.

Where suspicion reigns eternal
and everything is to be feared,
because you can swim
or teach Bible scenes through acting.

And everything is to be feared,
because if it doesn't fit with God's plan
or teach Bible scenes through acting
to the children in school.

Because if it doesn't fit with God's plan, 
like Quakers and girls from Barbados.
To the children in school
you are condemned a witch.

Like Quakers and girls from Barbados
who are a little different.
You are condemned a witch,
that is the end, you think.

Who are a little different,
where you know no one,
that is the end, you think;
traveling across the ocean.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

V is for View (from the Cheap Seats)

Something occurred to me right before I started writing this; not all books need to be fiction, and  some books are better as non-fiction.

That is a strange statement coming from me. The person who prefers fiction to reality, some days.

It  was apparent that The View from the Cheap Seats had to be today's book. There was also a mess of thoughts about how even the stories of your reality, or reality is general, can be just as fascinating as any fiction.

When Cheap Seats first came out, I was all over it. It was a Neil Gaiman book, so of course I needed it. I needed to read it. It wasn't fiction, but there was something magical about reading Neil's thoughts on books, movies, comic books, favourite author, movies of his books, his hawt musical wife, and being famous; I ate it up.

I read every single essay. No, likely I devoured every single essay. I may not have read some of the pieces that Neil wrote about, but I really got to feel like I had, or that I wanted to. Personal favourites include his essays on Douglas Adams, Ray Bradbury, one titled "Some Reflections on Myth", and  another titled "Make Good Art".

The whole book should be read, honestly, as there is something for everyone.

I may not even get the cheap seats; sometimes I get nosebleed seats and need to bring binoculars. Haha! So, I wrote my own tribute to the man and his book that gave to me something special: a love of non-fiction and essays. No one has done that before. And I have read some really wonderful non-fiction, but this one is special.

So, from my own place in the nosebleed seats, here's to you, Neil!

Musings From the Nosebleed Seats

In a book upon my shelf,
full of mysteries to delve into; 
not all stories have to be fiction,
sometimes reality is stranger than fiction.

Full of mysteries to delve into,
from a man no stranger to fantasy.
Sometimes reality is stranger than fiction
in the lives that we choose to live.

From a man no stranger to fantasy,
a writer writing on writing.
In the lives we choose to live,
and the books we choose to read.

A writer writing on writing,
yet it is the nature of the writer
and the books we choose to read,
that build our mythologies.

Yet it is the nature of the writer,
to find these connections
that build our mythologies
and to wax philosophical.

To find these connections
between our fantasies and realities
and to wax philosophical
from the nosebleed seats.

Between our fantasies and realities,
I have uncovered my own truths
from the nosebleed seats,
that maybe there is still hope.

I have uncovered my own truths;
not all stories have to be fiction,
that maybe there is still hope
in a book upon my shelf.